Taking Sports Massage A Step Further

massage after sportAs rugby players, we know just how much pressure we put our muscles under during sport. At Gold Coast Breakers we’ve all spent time on the sports massage table getting much needed relief to our aching muscles. I was speaking to my massage therapist about how she got into the line of work and it was and interesting story. I asked her to write an article on the topic of sports massage courses and here is what she provided for me. I hope you like it.


Choosing your future career can be hard as something may not be as good as it seems. That’s why FLM training provide arrange of fantastic courses to help you get practical with what you want to do, this lets you make sure this is what you really want to do; they teach physical work as there’s only so much to learn from books.

At FLM training they offer a level 3 diploma in sports massage therapy course available to those aged 16 years old and over, there are no specific entry requirements but it will help you if you have basic people skills and if you have a GCSE in biology or human biology or a certificate in anatomy and physiology. To do this course it will cost you £1,199, it will last 6 days and then a day for completing the assessment.

In these 6 days you will learn about anatomy & physiology, post event techniques and a various methods for dealing with a variety of injuries; as well as much more.  This course is extremely practical, so the best way for you to learn is for you to do it yourself. All of their tutors are well experienced in working with professional athletes and professional sports teams. This course is available in Manchester and Cardiff

Sports massage therapy is one of many different types of massage, two other popular ones being body massage and Indian head massage. This type of massage can improve muscle and skin tone, relieve aches associated with muscle tension and provide an increased ability to rid the body of toxins. Your clients would include people who are ill or recovering from sickness, those suffering from anxiety or depression and many others. This course will allow you to gain confidence when working with clients. You will learn how to treat sporting injuries like ankle sprains, collateral knee ligament sprains, lower back pain and much more.

This course was designed for those considering a career in active leisure or those who already work in active leisure and want to expand their skills. You will need to have good people skills and to be physically fit enough to complete the course and activity. Most sports massage therapists get to choose the hours they work but these still tend to be evenings and weekends as these are when their clients can make the sessions, they don’t earn a set wage as they chose an hourly wage and it depends on the amount of clients but on top of their wage can earn tips and commission; this wage can be around £25 an hour or more.

This qualification will allow learners to work as sports massage therapists in many organisations like spas, rehabilitation clinics and coaching facilities. Sports massage can help clients post injury, relieve stress and help those with repetitive strain injury.  If you’re already a personal trainer then this will add to your skill set, which means you will get more business and won’t have to refer clients to other people.


The Birth of Rugby and Its Two Broad Categories

rugby-1210835_1920Developed in Rugby, Warwickshire, the game rugby is a type of football that used to be played in the public schools of England in the 19th Century. The origin of the game dates back to the Greek and Roman times. Harpastum is a Roman game adapted from a Greek ball game mentioned by Antidepressant the 350 B.C. These games resembled rugby.

Over time, the game has undergone many changes in form, style, rules, and exposure to the world. Here is everything you need to know about the game.


Presently, there are two types of rugby games, the league and the union. The prominent demarcation of the types happened in 1895. Back then, the difference was just administration. Today, the league and union have different rules, therefore, becoming two different forms of the game. Post 1995, both the forms became inclusive in openly professional sports.

The Rugby Football Union (RFU), was created in 1871. The Northern Union (NU) was formed in 1892 following charges on professionalism against some existing English clubs. A tussle between these clubs and the new union led to the eventual separation of the ‘rugby league’ and the ‘rugby union’.


rugby-588413_1920The rules for the league and union forms are different today, but there are common grounds that make both the forms very similar. The similarities and differences include the following:

  • The ball– the rugby ball is oval and has a standard size and weight for both the forms. It is against the rule to throw the ball with hand. Both the forms require players to either run with it or kick it forward, thus making the game a type of football.
  • Number of players– The league has 13 players, while the union has 15. Until 1877, there used to be 20 players per team.
  • Tackle rules– In a union game, the fight for possession comes right after a tackle. In a league game, play-the-ball game is continued after tackle, there is no room for possession contest.
  • Scoring rules– What makes the league game faster is a six-tackle rule. In a league game, a team has to surrender possession of the ball if it does not score within six consecutive tackles. In a union game, there is no such rule. A team only lose possession of the ball if a member fouls.

sport-334499_1920Other differences include the scrum, and touch-line rules. All these little differences make the two forms very different in playing experience.

The ball

The rugby ball was initially called the quango. It is oval in shape just because it is easier to grip. However, another reason behind the shape is the balls were made by stitching leather case to pigs’ bladders. The size of the ball used to vary depending on the size of the bladder.

Today, the size of the ball is standardized to 280-300mm of length, 740-770mm of length-wise circumference, and 580-620mm of width-wise circumference. The air pressure is 9.5010.0 lb/square inch, and the weight ranges between 410-460 grams. Smaller size versions are available for younger teams.